A changing virus and constant access – POLITICO

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COVID-19 no longer finds itself at the top of policymakers’ agendas as governments grapple with health, economic and political challenges. However, we need to be vigilant, because the long-term problems related to the epidemic need to be solved and the solutions will require new approaches by policy makers and health systems.

The economic impact of the epidemic has been severe, with the medical system facing major challenges due to the overcrowding of hospitals.[i] The National Health Service (NHS) of England has acknowledged the challenges of COVID-19 in health care, and that in 2022, there were no fewer than 3,800 people hospitalized with the virus across the country every day, regardless of the time of year.[ii] Furthermore, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) estimates the global cost to be around $13.8 trillion by 2024.[iii] Although the number of infections fluctuates, it is important to remember the severity of the virus and prepare for new waves of disease.

Fortunately, we have made incredible progress against COVID-19. Medical research has led to different types of treatments being given full or emergency approval in different countries.

We have the opportunity to help those most at risk of the disease caused by COVID-19, reducing the burden on individuals, their health systems and society at large. [iv]

With more treatment options available today than ever before, we have the opportunity to help those most at risk of the disease caused by COVID-19, reducing the burden on individuals, their health systems and society at large. [iv]

In addition to this, there are sustainable benefits to adopting global and regional strategies to control the spread of COVID-19. Policy makers are asked to oversee plans and arrangements to deal with viruses like COVID-19 throughout the year, including providing access to treatment options, especially for those at high risk of severe symptoms. This can help reduce the stress on health systems.

Technology review bodies across Europe, such as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in England and Wales, have recognized that it is cost-effective to treat serious viral infections that lead to fewer hospital stays, potentially saving healthcare. The most important money system. [iv], [v]

Not only do these new methods work alongside vaccines, but peer review bodies across Europe, such as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in England and Wales, have found them to be cost-effective in treating serious infections caused by the virus, which causes hospital admissions. less, which can save much needed money. [iv],[v]

Estimates show that around 40 percent of the world’s older adults may be at high risk of contracting COVID-19, with one of the highest risk factors being those aged 65 and over.[vi] Policy makers and health systems can benefit from encouraging those at high risk of chronic disease to develop policies that will help them learn about additional options and treatment options, should they become infected, without disrupting their regular care.

The cooperation of various organizations has proven to be important in the fight against COVID-19, but the need to prepare is not limited to the virus and it is not only to organizations and institutions. The emphasis is now shifting to people with a greater voice to promote prevention and preparedness for all in our regions and countries. By advising on the need to develop sustainable plans, policy makers will be able to provide support to those who need it most in the fight against COVID-19 and future epidemics.

As we continue to live with COVID-19, policymakers can focus on year-round education and expanding eligibility for treatment, and supplementing existing immunization programs.

As we continue to live with COVID-19, policymakers can focus on year-round education and expanding eligibility for treatment, and supplementing existing immunization programs.


[i] Fayolah Richards, et al. “The Economic Burden of COVID-19: A Systematic Review”; ClinicoEconomics Research and Outcomes. April 28, 2022. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35509962/

[ii] “Emergency and Emergency Service Restoration Delivery Plan”; National Health Services England. January 2023. https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/B2034-delivery-plan-for-recovering-urgent-and-emergency-care-services.pdf

[iii] “A Global Approach to Managing the Long-Term Risks of COVID-19”; The International Monetary Fund. April 5, 2022. https://www.imf.org/en/Publications/WP/Issues/2022/04/04/A-Global-Strategy-to-Manage-the-Long-Term-Risks-of-COVID-19-516079

[iv] “NICE Recommends 3 Treatments for COVID-19 in Draft Guidance”; National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. November 16, 2022. https://www.nice.org.uk/news/article/nice-recommends-3-treatments-for-covid-19-in-draft-guidance

[v] “Treatment for People with COVID-19”; National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. November 2022. https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/gid-ta10936/documents/129

[vi] Clark A, Jit M, Warren-Gash C, et al. “Global, regional, and global estimates of the population at high risk of COVID-19 for health complications in 2020: A model study”; Lancet Global Health. 2020;8(8):1003-1017. doi:10.1016/s2214-109x(20)30264-3



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