Your Friday Brief – New York Times

[ad_1]

Hollywood union representing 160,000 TV and film actors agreed to strike yesterday for the first time in 43 years, bringing in $134 billion The American film and television industry has halted due to anger over wages and fear of the future of technology.

The announcement came after talks with the studio regarding a new deal ended. Actors today join show writers, who resigned in May, on picket lines in New York, Los Angeles and many other American cities where shows and movies are produced.

Both the writers’ and actors’ unions are said to be trying to ensure a living wage for today’s members, especially those who work in advertising. Screenwriters fear that studios will use AI to create scripts, and actors worry that the technology could be used to create digital replicas of their characters without payment or approval.

Possible: “I am surprised at how the people we have been doing business with treat us!” Fran Drescher, president of the theater association, said. “How far apart we are on so many issues. The way they plead poverty, that they are wasting money left and right while giving hundreds of millions of dollars to their CEOs. It’s disgusting. Shame on them!”

Results: While in jeopardy, the actors in the union cannot work in front of the camera, and will not be allowed to promote current projects – including big summer releases such as “Barbie,” “Oppenheimer” and “Haunted Mansion.”


Maj. Gen. Ivan Popov, the head of Russia’s military in Ukraine, has criticized his bosses after he was sacked, accusing them of interfering with military operations with dishonesty and politics. the latest sign of chaos within the military leadership of the Kremlin.

On tape, Popov accused his superiors of beating his army by removing him from his post in secret retaliation for the leadership’s military woes. The collapse reflects the disarray that has plagued Russia’s military since the failed coup led by mercenary boss Yevgeny Prigozhin three weeks ago.

Speculations have been swirling especially about the future of Gen. Sergei Surovikin, the head of the Ukrainian air force and army chief, who has not been seen in public since the rebellion and is said to have known before. A person close to the soldiers said that they are being arrested.

In other war stories:


Aspartame, an artificial sweetener widely used in alcoholic beverages and sugar-free foods, can cause cancer, the WHO said yesterday. But the agency’s second committee concluded that the product was marginally safer, and a 150-pound person could still drink twelve cans of soda a day and avoid the risk of cancer.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer stated that its conclusion that aspartame is a possible carcinogen was based on limited evidence from three human studies. The agency said the study linked the consumption of sugary drinks to an increased risk of liver cancer – at levels as low as twelve cans a day.

But the agency called for further research and warned that the results could be skewed for people who drink alcohol.

Other health issues: US health officials approved the first over the counter birth control pills.

He has a sad history and a penchant for petty crime. It’s Otter 841, a 5-year-old female otter from Santa Cruz, Calif., wanted for bad behavior towards surfers.

Jamaican Premier League attack: Enticing some of England’s top players to switch allegiances would benefit the Jamaicans Prospects for the 2026 World Cup.

On the set of Apple’s Formula 1 video: Why? Brad Pitt’s fake team entered the British Grand Prix.

How can you win on Wimbledon grass? Stay low, stay low and embrace the chaos.

One sesame burger bun, plus 20 slices of American cheese.

That is Real Cheeseburger recipe, an unlikely product from Burger King Thailand. The sandwich, priced at 109 Thai Baht, or about $3.15, went as quickly as it arrived, selling out in short supply for several days.

Although the Real Cheeseburger has not been recognized as a culinary masterpiece, its unique appearance and terrifying simplicity have garnered widespread attention. Social media posts showed customers trying it out, with piles of American cheese seemingly mingling with each bite.

The sandwich was “gut-wrenching,” said Eric Surbano, who tried it. “It makes me wonder why Burger King thought of this aside from viruses,” he added. “Maybe they just have too much cheese.” Maybe they just hate us.”

That’s it for today’s summary. Have a great week, and I’ll see you on Monday. – Natasha

PS Our series on slavery and racism in the US, “The 1619 Project,” was was nominated for an Emmy.

The latest episode of “The Daily” is in action.

Submit comments, ideas and reactions to Real Cheeseburger briefing@nytimes.com.

[ad_2]

Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *